Math story: Guji Guji

We read Guji Guji by Chih-Yuan Chen and talked about the story as a math story: How many crocodiles are there and how many ducks? How many stones do they carry to the bridge? Does every duck carry one stone?

Image from Guji Guji by Chih-Yuan Chen.

A math story could be about how many siblings there are if some are ducks and one is really a crocodile. Image from Guji Guji by Chih-Yuan Chen.

I had prepared a number of cut-out cardboard “stones” and could ask, How many stones would the ducks need if they each carried one stone?  I had another set of stones with numerals written on them and we could order them from least to greatest.

I then attempted an extension of this activity in which some of the stones were missing the number but this proved to be too hard for this group and I quickly had to add the number to all stones.

For those who wanted to stay after this, there was coloring of ducks and crocodiles to do.

 

Skills practiced: Counting, number recognition, ordering.

See the book read aloud by Robert Guillaume in the Story Line project.

Original idea for the story book choice is from the book “Cowboys Count, Monkeys Measure, and Princesses Problem Solve: Building Early Math Skills Through Storybooks” by  Jane Wilburne, Jane Keat and Mary Napoli.


How loooong is our step? Math story: Little Chick

Measure the length of our legs and our longest step with string.

Use two colors of string for the two categories of measurement. I tied a knot on the leg measures to distinguish them from the step measures, but that of course didn’t prevent the kids to copy me a tie knots on all their pieces of string, too.

Math story:
Little Chick by Amy Hest and Anita Jeram

Original idea for the story book choice is from the book “Cowboys Count, Monkeys Measure, and Princesses Problem Solve: Building Early Math Skills Through Storybooks” by  Jane Wilburne, Jane Keat and Mary Napoli.